Member of The Internet Defense League

MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow Highlights White Supremacist Operation To Support Trump

RACHEL MADDOW (HOST): Tonight we just got ahold of this disgusting development. This is the newspaper of the Ku Klux Klan today. It’s The Crusader, the political voice of white Christian America. The premier voice of white resistance. They’ve got — you see the white power symbol there in the upper right-hand corner? They’ve got a whole media operation going on apparently. Watch white pride TV, listen to KKK radio 24 hours a day. This newsletter is about 12 pages long, features articles on “the threat of nonwhite immigration,” a very subtle feature on black people committing terrible crimes against white people. There’s an article by the founder of the America First Party which is all about the terrorist Jews. He brags in his byline that he’s the man who David Duke credits for awakening him to the threat of Jewish supremacism. It’s exactly what you would think from the Ku Klux Klan newspaper. If you knew there was a Ku Klux Klan newspaper these days. But the front page full page story is “Make America Great Again” with a big featured center photo of Donald Trump. It’s one of several articles in the paper about Trump, including this in-set article about how Trump’s candidacy is “moving the dialogue forward.” I should tell you, this is a copy. We got a PDF scan of this. 

You see the picture there? That inset picture in that article is actually a still from a Saturday Night Live skit about seemingly normal Americans talking about how much they like Donald Trump and then slowly they reveal themselves to be like ironing their sheets because they are Klan members. Well, that was a Saturday Night Live skit a couple months ago. This is the Klan newspaper and they are basically, “Oh yeah, that skit kind of nailed it.” Look at the caption on that still from Saturday Night Live.Saturday Night Live produced a mock campaign ad, voters for Trump, in which average Americans explained why they were Trump supporters. Then viewers learned the supporters were affiliated with organizations such as the Ku Klux Klan. “In truth, many do share the same concerns.” The Klan is like, “congratulations, Saturday Night Live you nailed it.” According to the Klan, you got us exactly right. 

The Donald Trump endorsement version, edition, of the Klan newspaper, this has been turning up on front lawns in the great state of Georgia. This one, we just got a scan of. We obtained this tonight after it was picked up off a front lawn in Cartersville, Georgia, which is northwest of Atlanta. We think that we’re actually going to get a physical copy of the Klan paper that’s being distributed in Georgia over the next day or two. Right now this is just the scan. I’ll let you know when we get the original. 

[…]

Those are a couple of the many, many robo calls that were made during the Republican primary campaign on behalf of Donald Trump’s candidacy, calls made by a white nationalist group that calls itself the American National Super PAC. The Trump campaign doesn’t appear to have anything to do with these calls. They reportedly returned a donation from the white nationalist guy who you hear on the call when it was first reported that he was making these calls and that he was a Trump donor. It was further embarrassing to the Trump campaign when this guy, this farmer and white nationalist who does these robo calls, he was initially picked to be a Trump delegate to the Republican Convention this year before his delegate status once got yanked once it was widely reported.

Previously:

Trump’s Anti-Semitic Speech Came From Breitbart, The Alt-Right, And Alex Jones

Trump’s Neo-Nazi “Alt-Right” Supporters Suggest “Violent” “Race War” Response To So-Called Rigged Election

What Is The “Alt-Right”? A Guide To The White Nationalist Movement Now Leading Conservative Media

from Media Matters for America http://ift.tt/2e7Bp7s
via IFTTT


Open Thread – Worst Halloween Costumes, 2016

Open Thread - Worst Halloween Costumes, 2016

Adults should not dress in Pokemon.

Inflatable — inflatable?!? – Jabba the Hutt. No.

And too awful for this blog, Sexy Donald Trump, Harambe, and anything “native American.” Just don’t.

What kind of costumes are you seeing on the little trick or treaters tonight?

And it’s an open thread….


googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1386288741770-3’); });

from Latest from Crooks and Liars http://ift.tt/2e7zxMd
via IFTTT


Open thread for night owls—Marcy Wheeler: The judicial dysfunction behind the Comey whiplash

Of FBI Director James Comey’s announcement of newly found emails, Marcy Wheeler at emptywheel writes—The Story About Judicial Dysfunction Behind the Comey Whiplash:

[…] Underlying this entire controversy is another rule that DOJ and FBI claim to abide by but don’t, at all: FBI is not supposed to reveal details of ongoing investigations.

ol

Ghost_Owl_2.jpg

Indeed, according to the NYT, Comey pointed to the certainty that this would leak to justify his Friday letter.

But although Mr. Comey told Congress this summer that the Clinton investigation was complete, he believed that if word of the new emails leaked out — and it was sure to leak out, he concluded — he risked being accused of misleading Congress and the public ahead of an election, colleagues said.

Yet the US Attorney’s Manual, starting with this language on prejudicial information and continuing into several more clauses, makes it clear that these kinds of leaks are impermissible.

At no time shall any component or personnel of the Department of Justice furnish any statement or information that he or she knows or reasonably should know will have a substantial likelihood of materially prejudicing an adjudicative proceeding.

Comey, the boss of all the FBI Agents investigating this case, had another alternative, one he should have exercised months ago when it was clear those investigating this case were leaking promiscuously: demand that they shut up, conduct investigations of who was leaking, and discipline those who were doing so. Those leaks were already affecting election year concerns, but there has been little commentary about how they, too, break DOJ rules.

But instead of trying to get FBI Agents to follow DOJ guidelines, Comey instead decided to violate them himself.

Again, that’s absolutely toxic when discussing an investigation that might affect the presidential election, but FBI’s habitual blabbing is equally toxic for a bunch of less powerful people whose investigative details get leaked by the FBI all the time. […]

HIGH IMPACT STORIES • TOP COMMENTS

TWEET OF THE DAY

x

 BLAST FROM THE PAST

At Daily Kos on this date in 2007AMERICA LOVE IT

Pickup trucks are, in America, the perfect canvas for patriotism. I am the owner of an (unadorned) truck myself, so I can well appreciate the sheer square footage available for expressions of national loyalty. On a compact car, you can manage a few bumper stickers, a magnetic ribbon — the usual, which is not quite as good as a t-shirt, since t-shirts can have far more complex messages than a bumper sticker, and better than a lapel pin, since lapel pin messages are pretty much restricted to “flag — I has one”.

But a pickup is a grand canvas indeed, and the messages can be varied. In the lowest form, truck art takes the form of a cartoon Calvin pissing on something. The things Copyright Infringement Calvin will piss on seem endless — hey, he’s a rebel, he doesn’t even care about copyright law, he doesn’t follow your rules — but his hatred primarily centers around other brands of trucks.

Confederate flags are an infrequent but still familiar choice, even here in California. I have no idea why a confederate battle flag would have any emotional attachment for a California truck driver, aside from the most obvious interpretation, but there it is. “Cowboy Up” is quite popular, as are other forms of implying cowboy or cowgirlship while on the way to picking up overpriced milk at the ol’ Circle K.

On today’s Kagro in the Morning show: The last full week before election day! Greg Dworkin checks the weekend polls and headlines. The Comey disaster. Trump’s charity dumpster fire burns higher still. Trump lies about golf baseball. Josie Duffy Rice has more on America’s worst prosecutors. 

 YouTube | iTunes | LibSyn | Support the show: PatreonPayPalPayPal Subscription

from Daily Kos http://ift.tt/2fp40ei
via IFTTT


Several states could make elections fairer and voting more accessible via the ballot box this year

While Americans vote in crucial races for president, Congress, and state and local governments this year, many states will also decide on critical ballot measures to alter the very way we conduct our elections themselves. Proposed changes would affect the electoral system, access to voting, and campaign finance. When self-interested officeholders manipulate the system to stifle competition, and when Republicans try to make it harder to cast a ballot, initiatives are an excellent way to advance pro-democracy reform. Below, we’ll take a look at some of this November’s most important ballot measures.

Electoral System Reforms

Voters in Maine have the opportunity to end plurality-winner elections (also called “first past the post”), where the candidate with the most votes wins regardless of whether or not they have a majority—a system used almost universally throughout the country. It’s a system that, for instance, allowed Trump-supporting authoritarian and racist Republican Gov. Paul LePage to win with pluralities in 2010 and 2014 after Democrats and left-leaning independents split the vote. Now, Maine will vote on whether to adopt instant runoff voting, sometimes called ranked-choice voting, making it the first state to do so if the measure passes like the polls predict.

This system would allow voters to rank their top five preferred candidates in congressional and state races. If no one wins a majority in the first round, the last-place candidate is eliminated, and their voters are redistributed to their next highest preference. This process repeats until someone wins a majority. The beauty of this system is that it significantly reduces the likelihood that a candidate wins solely thanks to a split opposition, which is how LePage became governor in the first place—something Mainers likely regret after now that he’s become a national embarrassment.

This reform could lead to much greater electoral competition, too, as it could allow independents and third parties to compete without fear of playing spoiler. That could be particularly valuable for voters in districts that strongly favor one party or the other, since competition is a defining aspect of truly democratic elections. Unfortunately, this reform has its drawbacks: It makes voting more complicated, and it can still sometimes produce the “wrong” winner. However, it’s a major improvement upon our current system, and success in Maine could serve as a model for states across the country.

from Daily Kos http://ift.tt/2etMgJK
via IFTTT


Several states could make elections fairer and voting more accessible via the ballot box this year

While Americans vote in crucial races for president, Congress, and state and local governments this year, many states will also decide on critical ballot measures to alter the very way we conduct our elections themselves. Proposed changes would affect the electoral system, access to voting, and campaign finance. When self-interested officeholders manipulate the system to stifle competition, and when Republicans try to make it harder to cast a ballot, initiatives are an excellent way to advance pro-democracy reform. Below, we’ll take a look at some of this November’s most important ballot measures.

Electoral System Reforms

Voters in Maine have the opportunity to end plurality-winner elections (also called “first past the post”), where the candidate with the most votes wins regardless of whether or not they have a majority—a system used almost universally throughout the country. It’s a system that, for instance, allowed Trump-supporting authoritarian and racist Republican Gov. Paul LePage to win with pluralities in 2010 and 2014 after Democrats and left-leaning independents split the vote. Now, Maine will vote on whether to adopt instant runoff voting, sometimes called ranked-choice voting, making it the first state to do so if the measure passes like the polls predict.

This system would allow voters to rank their top five preferred candidates in congressional and state races. If no one wins a majority in the first round, the last-place candidate is eliminated, and their voters are redistributed to their next highest preference. This process repeats until someone wins a majority. The beauty of this system is that it significantly reduces the likelihood that a candidate wins solely thanks to a split opposition, which is how LePage became governor in the first place—something Mainers likely regret after now that he’s become a national embarrassment.

This reform could lead to much greater electoral competition, too, as it could allow independents and third parties to compete without fear of playing spoiler. That could be particularly valuable for voters in districts that strongly favor one party or the other, since competition is a defining aspect of truly democratic elections. Unfortunately, this reform has its drawbacks: It makes voting more complicated, and it can still sometimes produce the “wrong” winner. However, it’s a major improvement upon our current system, and success in Maine could serve as a model for states across the country.

from Daily Kos http://ift.tt/2etMgJK
via IFTTT


Several states could make elections fairer and voting more accessible via the ballot box this year

While Americans vote in crucial races for president, Congress, and state and local governments this year, many states will also decide on critical ballot measures to alter the very way we conduct our elections themselves. Proposed changes would affect the electoral system, access to voting, and campaign finance. When self-interested officeholders manipulate the system to stifle competition, and when Republicans try to make it harder to cast a ballot, initiatives are an excellent way to advance pro-democracy reform. Below, we’ll take a look at some of this November’s most important ballot measures.

Electoral System Reforms

Voters in Maine have the opportunity to end plurality-winner elections (also called “first past the post”), where the candidate with the most votes wins regardless of whether or not they have a majority—a system used almost universally throughout the country. It’s a system that, for instance, allowed Trump-supporting authoritarian and racist Republican Gov. Paul LePage to win with pluralities in 2010 and 2014 after Democrats and left-leaning independents split the vote. Now, Maine will vote on whether to adopt instant runoff voting, sometimes called ranked-choice voting, making it the first state to do so if the measure passes like the polls predict.

This system would allow voters to rank their top five preferred candidates in congressional and state races. If no one wins a majority in the first round, the last-place candidate is eliminated, and their voters are redistributed to their next highest preference. This process repeats until someone wins a majority. The beauty of this system is that it significantly reduces the likelihood that a candidate wins solely thanks to a split opposition, which is how LePage became governor in the first place—something Mainers likely regret after now that he’s become a national embarrassment.

This reform could lead to much greater electoral competition, too, as it could allow independents and third parties to compete without fear of playing spoiler. That could be particularly valuable for voters in districts that strongly favor one party or the other, since competition is a defining aspect of truly democratic elections. Unfortunately, this reform has its drawbacks: It makes voting more complicated, and it can still sometimes produce the “wrong” winner. However, it’s a major improvement upon our current system, and success in Maine could serve as a model for states across the country.

from Daily Kos http://ift.tt/2etMgJK
via IFTTT


C&L’s Late Nite Music Club With The Birthday Party

Well, with Halloween coming to a close I would say the scariest night of the year is coming to an end. Then I remembered we have to wait for the results of November 8th yet. Sure are a lot of bats in a lot of belfries.

This song really scared me when I first heard 30 some odd years ago. It’s still sounds as disturbed and unhinged now.

What are you listening to tonight?


googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1386288741770-3’); });

from Latest from Crooks and Liars http://ift.tt/2fyRFn6
via IFTTT